Every morning was a cheerful invitation to make my life of equal simplicity, and I may say innocence, with Nature herself. I have been as sincere a worshipper of Aurora as the Greeks. I got up early and bathed in the pond; that was a religious exercise, and one of the best things which I did. They say that characters were engraven on the bathing tub of King Tchingthang to this effect: “Renew thyself completely each day; do it again, and again, and forever again.” I can understand that. Morning brings back the heroic ages.
Thoreau

FACE OF A BOY HEARING FOR THE FIRST TIME

In 1974, Readers Digest published this picture from photojournalist Jack Bradley depicting the *exact moment* a boy hears for the first time. His doctor, an otorhinologist, has just placed an earpiece in the boy’s left ear. 

—and as one door shuts, another opens.

What did he hear? we wonder. His father’s voice? His doctor’s? Or his own? And what did he do next? Try his hearing out for awhile? And what did he say?

Imagine that: Trying your hearing out for awhile.

It’s the questions that stay.

 

(With thanks to Readers Digest, Jack Bradley and the young boy in the picture, Harold Whittles.)

((For a video of someone hearing for the first time, meet Jonathan.))

What Innovation Really Is

Asymco’s latest deconstructs the problem society has understanding innovation, as compared to novelty, creation and invention.


  I define innoveracy as the inability to understand creativity and the role it plays in society… The definition of innovation is easy to find but it’s one thing to read the definition and another to understand its meaning. Rather than defining it again, I propose using a simple taxonomy of related activities that put it in context:



Novelty: Something new
Creation: Something new and valuable
Invention: Something new, having potential value through utility
Innovation: Something new and uniquely useful



To illustrate further, here are some examples of the concepts.

Novelties: The choice of Gold as a color for the iPhone; the naming of a version of Android as “Kit Kat”; coining a new word.
Creations: The fall collection of a fashion designer; a new movie; a blog post.
Inventions: Anything described by a patent; The secret formula for Coca Cola.
Innovations: The iPhone pricing model; Google’s revenue model; The Ford production system; Wal-Mart’s store design; Amazon’s logistics.

What Innovation Really Is

Asymco’s latest deconstructs the problem society has understanding innovation, as compared to novelty, creation and invention.

I define innoveracy as the inability to understand creativity and the role it plays in society… The definition of innovation is easy to find but it’s one thing to read the definition and another to understand its meaning. Rather than defining it again, I propose using a simple taxonomy of related activities that put it in context:

  • Novelty: Something new
  • Creation: Something new and valuable
  • Invention: Something new, having potential value through utility
  • Innovation: Something new and uniquely useful

To illustrate further, here are some examples of the concepts.

  • Novelties: The choice of Gold as a color for the iPhone; the naming of a version of Android as “Kit Kat”; coining a new word.
  • Creations: The fall collection of a fashion designer; a new movie; a blog post.
  • Inventions: Anything described by a patent; The secret formula for Coca Cola.
  • Innovations: The iPhone pricing model; Google’s revenue model; The Ford production system; Wal-Mart’s store design; Amazon’s logistics.
A ‘VISUAL FINGERPRINT’ OF HITCHCOCK’S VERTIGO

From interaction designer Brendan Dawes comes Cinema Redux, a software-cum-art-thingy that outputs the DNA of a film:


  Created in 2004 and acquired for the MoMA permanent collection in 2008, Cinema Redux creates a single visual distillation of an entire movie; each row represents one minute of film time, comprised of 60 frames, each taken at one second intervals. The result is a unique fingerprint of an entire movie, born from taking many moments spread across time and bringing all of them together in one single moment to create something new.

A ‘VISUAL FINGERPRINT’ OF HITCHCOCK’S VERTIGO

From interaction designer Brendan Dawes comes Cinema Redux, a software-cum-art-thingy that outputs the DNA of a film:

Created in 2004 and acquired for the MoMA permanent collection in 2008, Cinema Redux creates a single visual distillation of an entire movie; each row represents one minute of film time, comprised of 60 frames, each taken at one second intervals. The result is a unique fingerprint of an entire movie, born from taking many moments spread across time and bringing all of them together in one single moment to create something new.